Monthly Archives: February 2013

46 posts

A Look Forward: March, 2013 Movies

I think it’s fair to say that 2013 has been less than impressive when it comes to cinematic offerings. Understandably, the start of every year is slow when it comes to movies, but this year it feels more noticeable. Unfortunately, March 2013 still doesn’t seem to offer much greater promise.

Borderlands, San Francisco Ballet

San Francisco Ballet Offers Suite en blanc, Borderlands and In the Night

Suite en blanc is a work plucked out of the archival past, cut and pasted onto today’s stage so that we may glimpse the oddest of baby steps taken toward breaking with convention in the name of purity. Arguments for and against tend to sidestep the nagging and disturbing fact that the modernist who birthed them provokes our outrage because his fascination with purity led him, eyes open, into the reactionary political camp of racial “purity,” the kissing cousin of The Final Solution.

Maina Gielgud

Interview with Maina Gielgud

Natalia Osipova’s first Giselles in London are for me unforgettable… All the steps are there, and I could agree if it were someone who was less of a genius, that they were not in the Romantic style, but I have my own ideas. She just gave you Giselle’s soul on a platter; I can’t think of it without being in tears. You believe in what she does. She takes the majority of the audience with her. It was the specialists who were revolted.

Movie Review: Dark Skies

In the suburbs, there’s a feeling of camaraderie. If you need a hand fixing the minivan’s broken taillight, Joe from next door can help you out. If you’d like a date night for Italian food and a romantic comedy in theaters, Christine from up the street can take the kids. No one ever shows up empty-handed to a neighborhood barbeque. With so many families packed into such a tiny space, who could possibly feel unsafe?

Tegan and Sara: Heartthrob

Album Review: Tegan and Sara’s Heartthrob

Heartthrob is deeply wounded and most of it is sad. Its emotional palette is reds and pinks, raw and tender, skin scrubbed too fiercely. But for all its sadness, all its discussion of never-going-to-work relationships, it’s an incredibly hopeful album. Not optimistic, per se but determined, teeth-gritted and snarling. Hope’s necessary for that, even if it is in small and ragged quantity. And hope’s never really stronger than when it’s down to its last shreds.