California Literary Review

Nature

Walking It Off – by Doug Peacock

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April 24th, 2007

Doug Peacock’s reputation frequently precedes him as does that of his late, larger-than-life friend and father figure Edward Abbey.

The Quiet Mountains – A Ten-Year Search for the Last Wild Trout of Mexico’s Sierra Madre Occidental – by Rex Johnson, Jr.

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April 24th, 2007

One region I’ve always wanted to wander about in is Mexico’s Sierra Madre Occidental mountains, a 1,000-mile range running from near the U.S. border down towards the isthmus of Panama.

Pilgrimage to Vallombrosa: From Vermont to Italy in the Footsteps of George Perkins Marsh – by John Elder

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April 24th, 2007

This is a beautiful book. The author is a professor of English at Middlebury College whose writing has centered on our natural environment.

The Hundredth Meridian by Chilton Williamson

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April 22nd, 2007

Chilton Williamson definitely cares about the West. Every essay in his collection The Hundredth Meridian – Seasons and Travels in the New Old West makes this abundantly clear.

The Essential Grizzly – The Mingled Fates of Men and Bears – by Doug Peacock and Andrea Peacock

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April 22nd, 2007

The style of this book is intriguing. Doug has written several short stories, called Portraits, based on his personal experiences with the bears around the northern Rockies, while Andrea contributes chapters revolving around interviews and reporting on the subject.

Bedrock: Writers on the Wonders of Geology by Lauret E. Savoy, Eldridge M. Moores, Judith E. Moores

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April 11th, 2007

How do we understand the natural forces that literally shape our world? How, over time have we attempted to explain sometimes spectacular, sometimes mysterious events?

Casting a Spell: The Bamboo Fly Rod and the American Pursuit of Perfection by George Black

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April 10th, 2007

Some years ago, back in the days of its relative anonymity, fly fishing was considered an arcane art practiced by mildly addled, eccentric cranks.

Jays, Films, and Georg Steller

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March 25th, 2007

O’Brian based Aubrey on a Royal Navy captain of two centuries ago, Thomas Cochrane. Lord Cochrane’s exploits were at least as great as those of the fictitious Aubrey, and hardly less than those of Britain’s greatest naval hero, Lord Nelson. But while O’Brian admitted that Cochrane was the inspiration for Aubrey, he did not tell us before he died in 2000 whether he had a real-life model for Maturin. The answer, I think, lies in the handsome bird that I see now beyond our sun room window.

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